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Submitted on
February 2, 2013
Image Size
3.1 MB
Resolution
4032×3024
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Views
882
Favourites
85 (who?)
Comments
7

Camera Data

Make
OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Model
E-620
Shutter Speed
1/250 second
Aperture
F/5.6
Focal Length
14 mm
ISO Speed
200
Date Taken
Dec 28, 2012, 3:49:52 PM
Software
OLYMPUS Viewer 2 1.31W
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Barania V by myusernameistaken2 Barania V by myusernameistaken2
Widok z Baraniej Góry w stronę Małej Fatry (Beskid Śląski/Poland)
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:icondreamsinstatic:
dreamsinstatic Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2013
Your fantastic work has been featured in Friday Night Features.
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:iconshadowelve:
Shadowelve Featured By Owner Mar 4, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer

Hello :wave:

You have been featured in #SkyAndNatureClub's Best of February 2013-Feature!
Please consider giving a :+fav: to spread the word, so more people can see the feature.

Have a nice day :hug:
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:iconmarrciano:
marrciano Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Podoba się
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:iconluckytoyn:
luckytoyn Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013
What a fabulous feeling...

Did this forest burn? The light is awesome, it makes the wood on the right so deep, I would love to walk in your scenery. That's very powerful!
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:iconmyusernameistaken2:
myusernameistaken2 Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
No, it's not on fire :] The clouds were quite low and the sun was slowly hiding behind the horizon.
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:iconluckytoyn:
luckytoyn Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2013
No no I mean some years before. It looks like the wood did burn in the past. When there are only few trees remaining in this kind of landscape, it suggests that the forest burn in the past.
Very nice picture :)
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:iconmyusernameistaken2:
myusernameistaken2 Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
The trees on that mountain were cut down as the woods in this area are dying. A few years ago the path that you can see on the right-hand side was still in the middle of a dense forest.
The type of spruce that you can see in the photos is not an indigenous species; the trees were planted here on a massive scale in the 19th century replacing a deciduous forest. Spruce was chosen because of its fast growth, however it turned out that the trees were not immune to climate changes, became vulnerable to diseases and eventually lost the fight with the bark beetle.
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